budgeting

Paying Yourself First: What, How, and Why

Don’t forget to pay yourself first. You’ve likely heard this old adage, but have you ever wondered what it actually means? And more importantly, why it’s so important? Paying yourself first essentially means placing money into savings before spending it, and there are two very easy ways to accomplish this.

Direct Deposit

If you have a direct deposit option in regards to your paycheck, take advantage of it and have a portion of your earnings deposited into a savings account while the remainder is deposited into a checking account used for paying bills. You could choose to have a percent of your earnings deposited into savings, or you could choose a set amount.

Along those same lines, having a percentage of your earnings deposited into a 401k retirement account is another great way to pay yourself while saving for your future. Trust me, your RV travel-loving 70 year old self will thank you.

 

Writing Yourself a Check

OK, physically writing a check to yourself is definitely a dated way of paying yourself. You could choose to withdraw cash from an ATM and either deposit it into a separate savings account or stash it under your mattress (which is definitely not advisable). You could also choose to transfer the money to a separate account via computer or smart phone. In order for this method to be successful, you will need to discipline yourself to transfer or withdraw the money as soon as your paycheck hits the bank. Otherwise, you’ll have spent your monthly savings budget on a new Summer wardrobe before you even realize what you’ve done.

 

Why Bother?

Have you ever looked at your bank statement at the end of the month and wondered where all of your money went? That is exactly the reason why paying yourself is vital to financial independence. It is far too tempting to overspend when you have extra money burning a hole in your checking account. It is also far too easy to mindlessly spend that extra money on lattes or margaritas if it isn’t already accounted for.

Paying yourself and not allowing that money to ever sit idle in checking is a surefire way of bulking your savings or getting yourself better prepared for retirement. Figure out which of these two methods works best for you, then start envisioning all those exotic vacations or that dream house you’ll be able to afford!

Earn Money

17 Easy Ways to Make Money Without Changing a Thing

I don’t think there’s a single person out there that doesn’t want to make more money. But let’s be real, the thought of slaving away several extra hours per week at a second job is less than appealing to most people. Wouldn’t it be great to earn more money by doing practically nothing? Surprisingly, it’s totally possible! Here are 17 ridiculously easy things you can do to make more money without barely lifting a finger.

  1. Ask For a Raise

When trying to make more money, the easiest place to start is at the job you already work at. So ask for a raise! If you’re as valuable to the company as you know you are, they should be happy to oblige. It costs employers a ridiculous amount of money to hire and train employees, so smart employers will do what they can to keep good employees.

2. Adjust Your Federal Tax Withholding

Most people look forward to a windfall every year courtesy of Uncle Sam himself. Unfortunately, this isn’t the government’s way of being generous and giving you a bonus. This is money that they took out of your paycheck all year to give themselves an interest-free loan. The fewer allowances you claim on your W-4, the more taxes will be withheld. If you claim a higher number on your W-4, you will have a smaller refund but will have more money on your paychecks each month — money that you can put away and earn interest on!

3. Online Surveys

By filling out short surveys online, you can earn gift cards or even cash. You definitely won’t get rich filling out online surveys, but if you’re consistent you can make a little extra spending money. My Survey, Swagbucks, and Global Test Market are my personal favorites.

4. Swagbucks

Swagbucks, as I mentioned in the previous section, is much more than just an online survey website. You can also surf the web, play games, and watch videos to earn money.

5. Install Data Collection Apps

There are companies out there that will pay you just to install an app on your phone. These apps analyze your phone habits: what apps you download, what websites you visit, how much time you spend on certain tasks on your phone. All you do is download the app, let it run in the background, then collect money or gift cards for letting it run. Nielsen Mobile Panel and Smart Panel are two that I have used with success.

6. Download Digit and Acorns

Digit and Acorns are apps that don’t actually make you more money, but they save money for you, making you feel like you’re making more. Digit analyzes your spending and earning habits and skims a little money here and there to deposit into a separate savings account. The idea is that by taking just a few dollars every few days, you never miss the money and you wind up saving money that you didn’t think you could save. Acorns is similar, but it rounds your transactions up to the nearest dollar then deposits the difference into an investment account for you.

7. Take Pictures

Are you always snapping cool pics on your phone? Sell them to stock photo websites!

8. Freelance Writing

Do you enjoy writing? Become a freelance writer and sell your writing!

9. Get Crafty

Remember those Pinterest DIY and craft projects you constantly pin but never get around to? Start getting crafty and sell them on Etsy!

10. Ebates

Ebates is an awesome website that I’ve been using for years. Every time I shop online, I pull up the Ebates website first. From there I find the website I planned on shopping at and click the link to that website. For example, I love online shopping at Nordstrom. Instead of typing in Nordstrom.com, I type in ebates.com, click on the link to Nordstrom, and it pulls up the Norstrom Website. I shop as normal, then Voila! Ebates sends me a check for a percentage of what I spent on my order.

11. Spring Cleaning

Start selling things around your house on Craigslist, Offer Up, or at a local consignment store. Hey, you’ll be doing your spring cleaning anyway. Why not get paid for it?

12. Lose Weight

I kid you not, there are companies that will pay you to lose weight! Now if that isn’t motivation, I don’t know what is. I recently joined Weight Watchers while they were running a promotion offering to pay me $100 if I lost 10 pounds within 90 days. (I’m happy to announce that my $100 Visa gift card is en route as we speak). Healthy Wage is another company that pays users to lose weight.

13. Start a Housesitting or Dog-Walking Business

You need somewhere to sleep, so why not get paid to sleep over at someone’s house while they’re on vacation? Or if you were already planning on going for a walk or walking your own dog, get paid to take someone else’s dog along!

14. Rent Out Your Spare Room

If you have an extra room in your home, find a roommate and charge them rent each month. Or rent it out on AirBNB for a few days at a time.

15. Switch to a Credit Union or Online Bank

Credit Unions and Online Banks tend to have much higher interest rates on checking accounts, savings accounts, money market accounts, and CD’s than your typical big, for profit bank.

16. Claim Your Unclaimed Property

Ever wonder what happens when you move and someone sends a check to you? Check with your state’s unclaimed property department (every state has one) to see if they’re sitting on some of your old checks.

17. Sell or Trade Old Gift Cards

We all have old gift cards we’ve been sitting on but never plan on spending. Like the $25 Coldstone gift card I’ve had for the last 5 years, which I’ve apparently been holding onto in case I ever decide to say a big eff you to my lactose intolerant stomach. Using websites or in-store kiosks you can either sell your gift card for money or trade it for a gift card that you’re much more likely to use.

budgeting

Why I Use Budgeting Apps

Have you ever had someone tell you all about how much they love spreadsheets? Maybe they’ve told you what a great tool they are when comparison shopping. Or maybe they love to use them to track their spending and budgeting. Perhaps you’ve listened to someone tell you how much spreadsheets have simplified this person’s life and how organized they are because of of this very precise type-A hobby of theirs.

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably rolled your eyes and wondered how someone could actually enjoy that level of structure in their life. I have personally tried to enjoy creating budget spreadsheets, but to no avail.

I created my budget for the month, went on spending as normal, then added all of the numbers together from my online banking statement at the end of the month and plugged them into my spreadsheet. That was not only time-consuming, but because I couldn’t see my spending in real time it didn’t help me spend any less.

Then I tried keeping track of my spending by taking the numbers every few days and adding them into my spreadsheet. That was just plain confusing, since I couldn’t remember which transactions I’d already added and which I hadn’t.

Then I discovered the wonderful world of budgeting apps.

Apps that budget for me

I have three budgeting apps that I use every day to track my spending. Personal Capital, Clarity Money, and Mint. The best thing about these apps is that they are ridiculously easy to use, and make budgeting a breeze. They are all free to download, which is a great perk. All of my online banking accounts are connected to these apps: checking accounts, savings accounts, credit cards, and investment accounts. I can sign in to any of these apps during the day and track my overall spending or my spending in a certain category.

Clarity Money keeps track of my credit score, which is extremely helpful to know. It also keeps track of any recurring payments it finds in my account and makes me aware of them, in case I’ve forgotten and want to cancel old accounts. Additionally, it tells me when it finds credit cards that would be better suited to my needs than the one I’m using.

Personal Capital is helpful because it tracks my net worth. I have my mortgage and student loan accounts, plus my home’s worth according to Zillow attached, so it really does show me the whole picture of my financial well-being. Not to mention the fact that I enjoy watching my net worth slowly increase each month as my debts get paid down, I beef up my savings, and the value of my house rises. It’s also quite easy to compare my spending this month on this date to my spending last month on this date, so it really helps to keep me in check and figure out where I can cut corners.

Mint is unique in all of the resources that it offers to its users. It has a robust collection of articles to browse on various money topics. It shows me credit card or loan offers that better suit me and my situation, and it also tracks my spending in all categories quite easily.

Apps that save for me

The other type of app that I’m obsessed with saves money for me. Yes, you heard me right. These apps connect to my bank account and save money little-by-little for me so that I don’t have to think about doing it myself. I have two that I use daily: Digit and Acorns.

Digit connects to my checking account and analyzes my spending. It somehow knows how much money I will have coming in at any certain point in the month and how much will be going out. Then it skims a few dollars here and there that it knows I won’t really miss and deposits it into a separate savings account for me. I can also set up recurring payments or make extra payments at any time.

One of my favorite ways to use Digit is to deposit money into my Digit account whenever I’ve saved anything. For example, whenever I go to a grocery store the receipt always tells me how much I saved by using coupons or by getting the club member discount. Before throwing the receipt away I always deposit that amount into my Digit account. So if my receipt tells me I saved $7.38 during my shopping trip, I add $7.38 to my Digit account. Or if I really practice my self control and brew my own coffee at home instead of buying a mocha on my way to work, I deposit $5 into my Digit account. I never really miss the money because I would have spent it anyway.

The other savings app that I absolutely adore is called Acorns. It also connects to my checking account, but rather than skimming a little money here and there, it rounds all of my transactions up to the nearest dollar and invests the difference. Let’s say I had a transaction that cost $10.45. Acorns would round that up to $11 and deposit the 55 cents into my Acorns account. Once I get $5 in that account, it invests it into ETF’s. I can also set up recurring payments to give myself a little boost. I definitely won’t be able to retire off of this account, but in the last 13 months I’ve invested $997.78, which definitely isn’t bad.

What’s the point?

The point I’m trying to make here is that budgeting (or saving) doesn’t have to be as hard as some people make it out to be. Sure you can tediously pore over your monthly transactions and add them into a spreadsheet. Or you can do it the lazy way and have your phone track it all for you in real time. The choice is up to you. But if it were my choice, I’d rather use that extra time to watch some Forensic Files or catch up on my sleep.