budgeting

Why I Use Budgeting Apps

Have you ever had someone tell you all about how much they love spreadsheets? Maybe they’ve told you what a great tool they are when comparison shopping. Or maybe they love to use them to track their spending and budgeting. Perhaps you’ve listened to someone tell you how much spreadsheets have simplified this person’s life and how organized they are because of of this very precise type-A hobby of theirs.

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably rolled your eyes and wondered how someone could actually enjoy that level of structure in their life. I have personally tried to enjoy creating budget spreadsheets, but to no avail.

I created my budget for the month, went on spending as normal, then added all of the numbers together from my online banking statement at the end of the month and plugged them into my spreadsheet. That was not only time-consuming, but because I couldn’t see my spending in real time it didn’t help me spend any less.

Then I tried keeping track of my spending by taking the numbers every few days and adding them into my spreadsheet. That was just plain confusing, since I couldn’t remember which transactions I’d already added and which I hadn’t.

Then I discovered the wonderful world of budgeting apps.

Apps that budget for me

I have three budgeting apps that I use every day to track my spending. Personal Capital, Clarity Money, and Mint. The best thing about these apps is that they are ridiculously easy to use, and make budgeting a breeze. They are all free to download, which is a great perk. All of my online banking accounts are connected to these apps: checking accounts, savings accounts, credit cards, and investment accounts. I can sign in to any of these apps during the day and track my overall spending or my spending in a certain category.

Clarity Money keeps track of my credit score, which is extremely helpful to know. It also keeps track of any recurring payments it finds in my account and makes me aware of them, in case I’ve forgotten and want to cancel old accounts. Additionally, it tells me when it finds credit cards that would be better suited to my needs than the one I’m using.

Personal Capital is helpful because it tracks my net worth. I have my mortgage and student loan accounts, plus my home’s worth according to Zillow attached, so it really does show me the whole picture of my financial well-being. Not to mention the fact that I enjoy watching my net worth slowly increase each month as my debts get paid down, I beef up my savings, and the value of my house rises. It’s also quite easy to compare my spending this month on this date to my spending last month on this date, so it really helps to keep me in check and figure out where I can cut corners.

Mint is unique in all of the resources that it offers to its users. It has a robust collection of articles to browse on various money topics. It shows me credit card or loan offers that better suit me and my situation, and it also tracks my spending in all categories quite easily.

Apps that save for me

The other type of app that I’m obsessed with saves money for me. Yes, you heard me right. These apps connect to my bank account and save money little-by-little for me so that I don’t have to think about doing it myself. I have two that I use daily: Digit and Acorns.

Digit connects to my checking account and analyzes my spending. It somehow knows how much money I will have coming in at any certain point in the month and how much will be going out. Then it skims a few dollars here and there that it knows I won’t really miss and deposits it into a separate savings account for me. I can also set up recurring payments or make extra payments at any time.

One of my favorite ways to use Digit is to deposit money into my Digit account whenever I’ve saved anything. For example, whenever I go to a grocery store the receipt always tells me how much I saved by using coupons or by getting the club member discount. Before throwing the receipt away I always deposit that amount into my Digit account. So if my receipt tells me I saved $7.38 during my shopping trip, I add $7.38 to my Digit account. Or if I really practice my self control and brew my own coffee at home instead of buying a mocha on my way to work, I deposit $5 into my Digit account. I never really miss the money because I would have spent it anyway.

The other savings app that I absolutely adore is called Acorns. It also connects to my checking account, but rather than skimming a little money here and there, it rounds all of my transactions up to the nearest dollar and invests the difference. Let’s say I had a transaction that cost $10.45. Acorns would round that up to $11 and deposit the 55 cents into my Acorns account. Once I get $5 in that account, it invests it into ETF’s. I can also set up recurring payments to give myself a little boost. I definitely won’t be able to retire off of this account, but in the last 13 months I’ve invested $997.78, which definitely isn’t bad.

What’s the point?

The point I’m trying to make here is that budgeting (or saving) doesn’t have to be as hard as some people make it out to be. Sure you can tediously pore over your monthly transactions and add them into a spreadsheet. Or you can do it the lazy way and have your phone track it all for you in real time. The choice is up to you. But if it were my choice, I’d rather use that extra time to watch some Forensic Files or catch up on my sleep.

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